Convos With Writers: 11 Questions with Nathan Bransford

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If you are in the writer world, then you already know of Nathan Bransford. His website/blog is lauded with awards from Writers Digest. He is a former literary agent and CNET social media manager. His tips for querying are recommended by some of the biggest names in books (ahem, Veronica Roth). He penned a trilogy of middle grade novels, and speaking of novels he literally wrote the book on them. Exhibit A: How to Write a Novel by Bransford himself

(Editor’s note: not only is this on my bookshelf, but it’s relatable and readable in just one day. Highly recommend).

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Nathan was game for a convo so sit up in that seat and get ready to hear some good ol’ fashioned storytelling from a guy who knows just about everything when it comes to books but can still cry about a good rejection.

And away we go…

1. What do you write and what are you reading?
I’m currently working on a young adult novel, in addition to my blog about writing and publishing. I recently finished reading Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi, which was fantastic by the way.

2. For years your website has consistently been named to the list of ‘Best Websites for Writers’ by Writer’s Digest. Assuming you don’t scroll your own posts, where do you go to get help or inspiration for your writing?
I mainly get my inspiration from my own writing and from the editing projects I’ve tackled over the years. I try to hone in as much as possible on what works and what doesn’t so I can develop “rules” that will help me see my own work more objectively in the future.

3. You used to be a literary agent. Talk to me about all the times your name has been misspelled (and other pet peeves, natch).
Oh man. That’s assuming they even got my name right entirely. I kept track on query salutations one time and fully 23% of the people who queried me got it wrong. And it’s the absolute easiest thing to get right!!

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4. Tell me about rejection.
I was an agent when I was submitting Jacob Wonderbar to agents, and a part of me thought it was going to be a walk in the park. I mean, I was an agent! I knew a bunch of agents! Then all the agents I knew rejected me.
Thankfully Catherine Drayton took me on, then she submitted it to editors. I had submitted tons of books to editors so naturally I thought I would be super cool out on submission. Two weeks and a dozen rejections later I was awake at 2am on a hotel room floor in the fetal position. But eventually I got a few offers and chose to go with Penguin. Then when Jacob Wonderbar was getting reviewed I found out a certain publication accused me of stereotyping and I was sobbing in a cab.
Rejection is constant and I don’t think it really gets easier. You just have to suffer through it to get to the good stuff.

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5. How did you come up with the idea for Jacob Wonderbar? Have you always wanted to write Middle Grade?
The idea for Jacob Wonderbar just came to me one day, I didn’t set out to write a Middle Grade novel. I imagined this kid stuck on a planet full of substitute teachers, and from there, I just kept building the world around that kid.

6. Who do you love and how does that sneak into your writing?
My friends and family. I haven’t yet written a character who is based on a single person, but there are little snippets in there everywhere.

7. It’s a tradition in this series to ask about writing sex scenes. What can you share?
That I’m terrified of my mom reading one I’ve written.

8. Biggest, wildest dream for yourself?
I’d like to earn enough from writing that I could own a brownstone in Brooklyn and “rent” the in-law apartment downstairs for free to a promising novelist working on their debut.

9. Writing a novel feels so overwhelming yet you (literally) wrote the book on how to do it. What advice you share to ease a first time writer’s fears?
Embrace the right kind of fear! Fear how upset you’ll be if you don’t ever write your novel more than you fear feeling crazy for trying to write one.

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10. Let’s talk about the cover art for the Jacob Wonderbar series.
I was ridiculously lucky that Penguin chose Christopher Jennings to do the illustrations. In fact, I had originally described Dexter differently than Christopher drew him, but I liked Christopher’s illustrations so much I changed Dexter’s description to match the illustrations.

11. Tell me a story about a story.
There once was a storied story named “Story,” which was written on the 15th story.

Bonus points:
How many book ideas or half-drafts of novels are laying around your hard drive?
My hard drive is 95% story ideas, 5% actual novels.
Least favorite word?
Hack, in pretty much every usage possible.

Humble thanks to Nathan for sharing so candidly (even about sex scenes which one day his mom might read).

Peruse Nathan’s popular blog
Follow him on Instagram
Also on Twitter
He’s even on Facebook
Purchase his books
And be a good person (just because)

***As part of this series, writers are asked to submit photos capturing who they are as well as a glimpse of his/her writer life.
***Know someone that would be a great fit for 11 Questions? Nominate them or yourself: KellyQBooks (@) gmail (dot) com

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